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CKCK QSL card - 1962 Scan Copyright © John in MontanaMany more great QSL cards of the past can be found on this page of John’s website:QSL Cards from the John in Montana CollectionThe original CKCK signed off the air in 2001 after having been broadcasting since 1922.  620 KHz in Regina is now occupied by CKRM and a “hit country” format.  The call letters were resurrected on FM in 2002.  After a previously glorious history for CKCK, it is now sadly just another North American signal churning out that mindless abomination known as Jack FM.
CKCK QSL card - 1962
 
Scan Copyright © John in Montana

Many more great QSL cards of the past can be found on this page of John’s website:

QSL Cards from the John in Montana Collection

The original CKCK signed off the air in 2001 after having been broadcasting since 1922. 620 KHz in Regina is now occupied by CKRM and a “hit country” format. The call letters were resurrected on FM in 2002. After a previously glorious history for CKCK, it is now sadly just another North American signal churning out that mindless abomination known as Jack FM.
klappersacks:

(via Klapperscans)

As a radio history buff, this bent my brain a little bit because WGY are call letters that have been identified with Schenectady since 1922.  Yes, certain stations were owned by food companies back in those days but I knew WGY was owned by General Electric in that era.As I gathered from several sources, the story goes that the Jonathan Levi Company decided to open a new chain of grocery stores in the Schenectady area and “probably” named them after the station due to its popularity.  I would say it’s more like definitely since there’s no doubt that’s a very old-style radio transmission antenna hung above the factories in the label’s shield.  That also helps date this label as most likely being from anywhere between 1930 and 1938 as it was in ‘38 when WGY built a new tower-style antenna that is still in use today.As with most stations of its kind, WGY is now in the hands of the Clear Channel Communications conglomerate and doesn’t do much anymore beyond churning out the usual syndicated political blowhard programming.

klappersacks:

(via Klapperscans)

As a radio history buff, this bent my brain a little bit because WGY are call letters that have been identified with Schenectady since 1922. Yes, certain stations were owned by food companies back in those days but I knew WGY was owned by General Electric in that era.

As I gathered from several sources, the story goes that the Jonathan Levi Company decided to open a new chain of grocery stores in the Schenectady area and “probably” named them after the station due to its popularity. I would say it’s more like definitely since there’s no doubt that’s a very old-style radio transmission antenna hung above the factories in the label’s shield. That also helps date this label as most likely being from anywhere between 1930 and 1938 as it was in ‘38 when WGY built a new tower-style antenna that is still in use today.

As with most stations of its kind, WGY is now in the hands of the Clear Channel Communications conglomerate and doesn’t do much anymore beyond churning out the usual syndicated political blowhard programming.
broadcastarchive-umd:

Before slides, before electronic character generation, TV stations used hand-painted title cards for station identification (and holiday greetings).
KAKE, channel 10, is an ABC-affiliated television station based in Wichita, Kansas. The station is owned by Atlanta, Georgia-based Gray Television. KAKE is also the flagship station of the KAKEland Television Network, a statewide network of full-power stations, low-power stations, and translators relaying ABC network programming across central and western Kansas. (Wikipedia)

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broadcastarchive-umd:

Before slides, before electronic character generation, TV stations used hand-painted title cards for station identification (and holiday greetings).

KAKE, channel 10, is an ABC-affiliated television station based in Wichita, Kansas. The station is owned by Atlanta, Georgia-based Gray Television. KAKE is also the flagship station of the KAKEland Television Network, a statewide network of full-power stations, low-power stations, and translators relaying ABC network programming across central and western Kansas. (Wikipedia)

CBS News Bulletin slide - 1960s Fifty years ago today at 1:40 p.m. Eastern Standard Time, 12:40 p.m. Central, this slide suddenly interrupted CBS's regular telecast of its soap opera, As the World Turns.  What followed was the first nationwide television report that President John F. Kennedy had been shot.  The voice bringing the news to CBS viewers was the now-legendary Walter Cronkite.  Cronkite had to speak behind the slide because there was no “hot” camera in the newsroom and the vacuum tubes used in those days took 20 to 30 minutes to warm up enough to allow the equipment to be used.The passage of time and what happened in American television from this point through the end of Cronkite’s tenure at CBS News has made a huge imprint on the country’s collective memory.  In many minds, it’s almost as if CBS was the only broadcaster that covered the assassination.  This is certainly not the case.I’m sure it will be repeated ad nauseum today through all of the stuff coming through Tumblr, Twitter, and elsewhere on the 50th anniversary of this event that CBS will be streaming its full four days of coverage beginning today at 1:40 p.m. EST, the same time the slide above first appeared on November 22, 1963.  However, while probably not as crystal-clear as that stream will be, I would like to offer a much easier and broader alternative.A gentleman named David Von Pein has an amazing collection of these videos including the 10 minutes of As the World Turns that ran before the first bulletin (and the portion afterward before CBS went into four days of wall-to-wall coverage), all of the first day of NBC's coverage including their opening announcement made in New York by Don Pardo (yes, the long-time Saturday Night Live announcer), ABC's early coverage, and the early coverage of WFAA in Dallas including an interview wih none other than Abraham Zapruder.  In addition, he has most of the known original radio coverage from the major networks plus great local coverage from several Dallas/Fort Worth stations.  This includes an amazing 3-plus hours from KLIF (in its days at 1190 KHz) that begins with Kennedy’s arrival at Love Field and contains tons of old music, commercials, and announcements before the big news breaks.As Mr. Von Pein’s videos are occasionally removed from YouTube, it is always best to start at his page on Blogger to get to his material.The JFK Assassination As It HappenedThere are many interesting things to be noted in all of the different versions of the coverage aside from the realization that CBS’s iconic broadcasts were not the only game in town.  In a time well before mobile devices much less the Internet, it should be remembered that most people received the early hours of this news via radio.  I also find it fascinating to see the inevitable mistakes certain broadcasts made and wonder how much they might have fueled some of the most stubborn of the conspiracy theories that followed.I hope my Followers will take some time to go through at least part of Mr. Von Pein’s stunning collection.  It is fascinating on many levels even though the subject is so terrible.
CBS News Bulletin slide - 1960s
 
Fifty years ago today at 1:40 p.m. Eastern Standard Time, 12:40 p.m. Central, this slide suddenly interrupted CBS's regular telecast of its soap opera, As the World Turns. What followed was the first nationwide television report that President John F. Kennedy had been shot. The voice bringing the news to CBS viewers was the now-legendary Walter Cronkite. Cronkite had to speak behind the slide because there was no “hot” camera in the newsroom and the vacuum tubes used in those days took 20 to 30 minutes to warm up enough to allow the equipment to be used.

The passage of time and what happened in American television from this point through the end of Cronkite’s tenure at CBS News has made a huge imprint on the country’s collective memory. In many minds, it’s almost as if CBS was the only broadcaster that covered the assassination. This is certainly not the case.

I’m sure it will be repeated ad nauseum today through all of the stuff coming through Tumblr, Twitter, and elsewhere on the 50th anniversary of this event that CBS will be streaming its full four days of coverage beginning today at 1:40 p.m. EST, the same time the slide above first appeared on November 22, 1963. However, while probably not as crystal-clear as that stream will be, I would like to offer a much easier and broader alternative.

A gentleman named David Von Pein has an amazing collection of these videos including the 10 minutes of As the World Turns that ran before the first bulletin (and the portion afterward before CBS went into four days of wall-to-wall coverage), all of the first day of NBC's coverage including their opening announcement made in New York by Don Pardo (yes, the long-time Saturday Night Live announcer), ABC's early coverage, and the early coverage of WFAA in Dallas including an interview wih none other than Abraham Zapruder. In addition, he has most of the known original radio coverage from the major networks plus great local coverage from several Dallas/Fort Worth stations. This includes an amazing 3-plus hours from KLIF (in its days at 1190 KHz) that begins with Kennedy’s arrival at Love Field and contains tons of old music, commercials, and announcements before the big news breaks.

As Mr. Von Pein’s videos are occasionally removed from YouTube, it is always best to start at his page on Blogger to get to his material.

The JFK Assassination As It Happened

There are many interesting things to be noted in all of the different versions of the coverage aside from the realization that CBS’s iconic broadcasts were not the only game in town. In a time well before mobile devices much less the Internet, it should be remembered that most people received the early hours of this news via radio. I also find it fascinating to see the inevitable mistakes certain broadcasts made and wonder how much they might have fueled some of the most stubborn of the conspiracy theories that followed.

I hope my Followers will take some time to go through at least part of Mr. Von Pein’s stunning collection. It is fascinating on many levels even though the subject is so terrible.
KCBH - Beverly Hills, California USA (date unknown)Credit: Broadcasting and Radio Photo Archives by Marvin CollinsIn addition to KCBH, several other call signs have been used on the 98.7 MHz frequency in the history of radio in the Los Angeles area including KMGM and KJOI.  These days it is KYSR that broadcasts one of the worst versions of the “alternative rock” format ever concocted.
KCBH - Beverly Hills, California USA (date unknown)

Credit: Broadcasting and Radio Photo Archives by Marvin Collins

In addition to KCBH, several other call signs have been used on the 98.7 MHz frequency in the history of radio in the Los Angeles area including KMGM and KJOI. These days it is KYSR that broadcasts one of the worst versions of the “alternative rock” format ever concocted.
fadedsignals:

Here’s a great 1950 ad celebrating KOIN-AM/Portland’s 25-year anniversary.
KQP signed on the air in 1925.  The call letters became KOIN (“Know Oregon’s Independent Newspaper” — The Portland News owned the station) in 1926.  The station joined CBS in 1928.  
Some details about KOIN’s early days from PDXHistory.com: 

Live music made up 8 out of 12 programs during the day and KOIN maintained its own orchestra of versatile musicians and in the early days. The first conductor of KOIN’s Orchestra was Mischa Pelz. Live music was featured four hours a day during the first two months on the air and within six months, it was featured as much as eight hours a day. A new pipe organ was purchased in 1926 for $25,000 and it was installed in the hotel studios. Live music was KOIN’s mainstay. KOIN’s staff of performers and musicians was larger than all of Portland’s other stations combined.

The station moved to 970 AM in 1941.  KOIN-FM started in 1948 and KOIN-TV in 1953.  It was one of the last radio stations in the country with staff musicians, but live music broadcasts ended in 1971.
KOIN had a middle-of-the-road format before Gaylord Broadcasting bought the station in 1977, flipped it to Top 40 and changed the call letters to KYTE.  Owners tried country, adult standards, classical, oldies, alternative rock and other formats (along with several sets of new call letters) before settling on the current incarnation: “Freedom 970,” a talk station with KUFO call letters.
The KOIN call letters remain on Channel 6.
Source: Wikipedia (KUFO)

fadedsignals:

Here’s a great 1950 ad celebrating KOIN-AM/Portland’s 25-year anniversary.

KQP signed on the air in 1925.  The call letters became KOIN (“Know Oregon’s Independent Newspaper” — The Portland News owned the station) in 1926.  The station joined CBS in 1928.  

Some details about KOIN’s early days from PDXHistory.com

Live music made up 8 out of 12 programs during the day and KOIN maintained its own orchestra of versatile musicians and in the early days. The first conductor of KOIN’s Orchestra was Mischa Pelz. Live music was featured four hours a day during the first two months on the air and within six months, it was featured as much as eight hours a day. A new pipe organ was purchased in 1926 for $25,000 and it was installed in the hotel studios. Live music was KOIN’s mainstay. KOIN’s staff of performers and musicians was larger than all of Portland’s other stations combined.

The station moved to 970 AM in 1941.  KOIN-FM started in 1948 and KOIN-TV in 1953.  It was one of the last radio stations in the country with staff musicians, but live music broadcasts ended in 1971.

KOIN had a middle-of-the-road format before Gaylord Broadcasting bought the station in 1977, flipped it to Top 40 and changed the call letters to KYTE.  Owners tried country, adult standards, classical, oldies, alternative rock and other formats (along with several sets of new call letters) before settling on the current incarnation: “Freedom 970,” a talk station with KUFO call letters.

The KOIN call letters remain on Channel 6.

Source: Wikipedia (KUFO)